Top 3 Reasons Your Brand Is Failing On Twitter

By on May 30, 2014
Failing On Twitter


With over 255 million monthly active users and expected to grow 24.4% in 2014, Twitter is a platform that businesses can not afford to ignore.

There are many ways to use this social network effectively to gain followers, spread your influence, and promote your business.

However, there are also many things that companies are doing wrong that will turn users away.

Here Are The Top 3 Reasons Why Your Brand is Failing on Twitter

1) Too Much Self-Promotion

For many, the objective of using social media as a business tool will be to generate leads and convert them into buyers in order to increase revenue. Nonetheless, this does not mean that every Tweet should be a sales message!

Social media expert Amy Jo Martin says that, unlike television,“Social media is a dialogue, and not a monologue.”

It is not a broadcast medium, it is a tool that is designed to drive conversations first.

After all, that is what the “social” part of social media stands for!

One way to solve this problem is to apply the “70/20/10 Rule” that many social media managers employ:
  • 70% of Tweets should promote your brand as a thought leader in your industry.
    • “Paying it forward.” The goal of these posts is to add value to your audience. This is done by sharing interesting content (articles, images, videos) and tips that you have run into that are relevant to your business.
  • 20% of Tweets should revolve around engagement.
    • This means that you are responding to mentions, retweeting others’ posts, answering customer service inquiries, and generally interacting with the Twitter world.
    • Followers can easily tell the difference between an active account and an automated one pushing out noise. It’s not fooling anyone!
  • 10% of the remaining Tweets can be self-promotional.
    • By adding value first with the other 90% of tweets, you can subtly slip in the occasional brand-related message by advertising new products, offering sales and coupons, promoting events and more.

Another widely used format is the “80/20 Rule” which similarly advocates sharing 80% content that relates to your business with the other 20% dedicated to promotions.

2) Lack of Interaction

Failing On Twitter

No one likes to be ignored.

William James once said, “The deepest principle in human nature is the craving to be appreciated.”

For many brands, your fanbase and level of interaction may be too large to respond to every question or thank every single user who engages with you on Twitter.

However, for smaller brands it is absolutely imperative that you answer questions and show your appreciation to those who are helping build your brand.

A simple “Thank You” can go a long way in establishing trust and presenting your company as one that provides excellent customer service – both which are key ingredients of business success. Again, this comes down to one of the main principles of social media, that it is designed to be a two-way conversation.

Would you ignore someone’s question, comment, or praise in public? If so, that person will probably end up resenting you and, in the world of social media, one bad move can result in a PR crisis and spread like wildfire in a matter of minutes.

3) Your Content is Boring

The amount of noise on social media can be overwhelming, especially on Twitter where Tweets are produced at the astounding rate of 500 million per day.

Here is another important fact: People like to have fun!

While many B2B businesses want to project a professional image at all times, there is also a fine line between professional content and boring content.

The companies that are using Twitter effectively all have one thing in common: They provide interesting, high-quality content that adds value to the audience – whether it is through entertainment, education, or through great customer service.

Since Twitter has gotten out of the niche stage and into mainstream acceptance and use, there are many ways that brands are using this medium correctly for business.

Hopefully our article today has helped to see what brands are doing incorrectly, and how to revise and improve your strategy regarding this particular channel of social media marketing.

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to reach out to us on Twitter or by leaving your feedback below, and thank you for reading!

About David Ahn

David entered the business world as a marketing intern at NanoLumens – an Atlanta tech startup that provides unique digital LED signage. While interning for the company, he found a particular interest in content marketing, social media, and visual branding. After completing the internship, he began his professional career with iFusion Marketing working with Atlanta tech startups. In 2013, he joined SMMU as a blogger, copywriter, and social media manager. Connect with him on Twitter @Dav1dAhn.
Close

Like what you're reading?

Like us on Twitter, Facebook or Google+ for more!